Benefits and Properties
of Neroli Essential Oil

Botanical Name

Citrus auranticum amara / Citrus bigardia 

Family

Rutaceae

Place of Origin

Neroli comes from the white flower blossoms of the Seville Orange or Bitter Orange tree which originated in China. Today it is also cultivated in the Mediterranean area - Sicily, southern France, Morocco, Tunisia, and Egypt

Plant Description
The Seville Orange or Bitter Orange tree grows 18 to 30 feet high with expansive growth and evergreen oval, pointed leaves with winged stems and small white flowers.

Essential Oil
It is produced by the enfleurage method and also steam distilled from the fresh blossoms. It takes 1,000 hand picked flower blossoms to yield 1 lb of oil; it is one of the more expensive oils. The oil is light yellow in color. (some say it can be thick and deep brown).

The aroma is bitter sweet, spicy, highly radiant and enchanting.

It is a base note oil.

Its character is yin with high yang content.

Contains
Neroliodol, geraniol, linalol, nerol, limonene, linalyl acetate, indol, jasmine, anthranil acid,

Blends well with
Rose, lavender, sandalwood, jasmine, cedar, geranium, lemon, pine, clary sage, and benzoin; almost any floral oil

Safety
Use in moderation as can be addictive or nauseating is used too often.

Approximate drops per use
Use about 4-5 drops in 1 ounce of carrier

Beneficial Effects – Physical
Antiseptic; bactericide; germicidal; antispasmodic; Cell regenerator; hypotensive; cardiac tonic

Specific Conditions – Physical
Good choice for sensitive skin; dry or mature skin; scarring; stretch marks; radiated or extremely sunburned skin; varicose veins; broken capillaries; acne; wrinkles; skin irritations; Reduces cramps; stimulates digestion; diarrhea from nervousness; flatulence; relaxes muscle; headaches; aids labor; stiff joints from tension; carpal tunnel syndrome; hemorrhoids; low blood pressure; palpitations; nervous heart; tachycardia; menopausal problems; painful, scanty, clotty menstruations

Beneficial Effects – Mental
Calmative; relaxing; hypnotic; nerve tonic; balancing; sedative; aphrodisiac; antidepressant; natural tranquilizer

Specific Conditions – Mental
Anxiety; depression; insomnia, mental fatigue; test anxiety; shock; panic attacks; hysteria: fear; stress; PMS; menopause; irritability; sadness; hopelessness; post shock; trauma

Return to Top of Page

Neroli essential oil is beneficial for all skin conditions as it stimulates the growth of new cells so it supports skin’s renewal process.  Since it is not irritating it is excellent for sensitive or inflamed skin.

 

It is also very good for calming the nervous system, use in a aroma lamp, a bath, compress or massage oil.

 

It is helpful for depression, it is used in “rescue remedy” in Bach flower therapy.  It brings strength and relief to seemingly hopeless situations.

 

 When easily angered can shift you mood to be relaxed and experience life with joy and calm – wear in a aroma necklace.

 

For premenstrual syndrome add 7 drops neroli to 3 TBSP honey in your bath every night for seven days prior to the onset of menstruation.

 

It helps regulate heart rhythm and reduce cramp-like nervous heart conditions. Use in an aroma lamp, in the bath, for massage or you can take it orally (take orally only under supervision of a professional) at the rate of 2 drops two or three times a day.

 

For chronic diarrhea from nervous conditions use it in a massage on your stomach or take orally at the rate of 2 drops two or three times a day.

 

Is it exam time and your have test anxiety - take 2 drops in a spoon of honey.

 

Used in cosmetics for lotions, bath oils, perfumes, soap, deodorants, shampoo and more.

 

Here is a little history on Neroli essential oils: Anna Maria de la Tremoille, Princess of Nerole in the 17th century introduced orange blossom oil to Italian society.  She loved the fragrance so much that she used it everywhere (bath and perfume, scented her clothes, gloves, lace shawls, stationery, ribbons and many other ways she found to use it). The nobility soon followed her example and it is thought that the oil was called neroli in her honor.  For centuries this oil was used in bridal head-dresses so the scent would calm the bride's nerves.

 

Return to Top of Page

 Find out about Carrier Oils so you know which to use with your essential oil.

 Recipes to make lotions, salves and more.

 

Leave Neroli Essential Oil and go to Individual Essential Oils

 

Go to  Aromatherapy & Natural Healing Home Page